new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale
new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale_top
new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale__after

Description

Product Description

Millions of gifted children are failing to reach their potential something Dr. Sylvia Rimm calls underachievement syndrome. Drawing on both clinical research and years of experience counseling families, Dr. Rimm has developed a Trifocal Model to help parents and teachers work together to get students back on track. It is effective for a wide range of students, from preschool through college. Dr. Rimm s practical, six-step program provides everything you need to know to turn your child or student s underachievement into success.

Review

"...Down-to-earth advice parents desperately seek when struggling to motivate their underachievers." --The Washington Post Education Review (In reference to previous edition)

About the Author

Sylvia Rimm, Ph.D., is a best-selling author who was a contributing correspondent for nine years on NBC s Today Show and who hosts a nationally broadcast radio program Family Talk with Sylvia Rimm. Dr. Rimm is a psychologist who specializes in working with gifted children and is the director of the Family Achievement Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. She also writes a syndicated newspaper column on parenting.

She has authored hundreds of articles and more than 20 books, including See Jane Win, which described her research on the childhoods of successful women. This book hit the New York Times Bestseller list and was also featured on the Oprah Winfrey and Today Shows, and in People magazine. Another book she wrote, Rescuing the Emotional Lives of Overweight Children, was a finalist for the Books for a Better Life Award. Katie Couric, former long-time host of NBC s Today Show, says, Dr. Rimm is a welcome voice of calm and reason someone who offers practical advice, with almost immediate results. She s a guardian angel for families who need a little or a lot of guidance.

Dr. Rimm has served on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children, and is a frequent keynote speaker at conferences. A mother of four, and grandmother of nine, she lives in Cleveland with her husband.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1: What Is Underachievement?

Our nation continually searches for better ways to educate its children. National and international studies routinely report depressing statistics about U.S. children''s lack of basic skills, inadequate knowledge of science, below-average skills in mathematics, inept critical thinking, and poor problem-solving abilities, as well as their lack of readiness for post-high school education and the workforce. The U.S. Department of Education conducted a study, ending in 2001, which reported that only 53% of students who enter a four-year institution actually earn a bachelor''s degree.

These problems have been blamed on such villains as television, movies, violent computer and video games, the economy, the breakdown of the family, large classes, the Internet, not enough class time, shortages of funds, and poor discipline. Education professionals complicate the discussion by use of such inside jargon as "cultural deprivation," "learning disabilities," "tracking," "test bias," "no child left behind," "Title One," and "inclusion." Children are diagnosed with disorders such as Learning Disability, Executive Dysfunction difficulties, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Asperger''s Syndrome, Bipolar Disorder, Overanxious Disorder, and Depressive Reaction. The endless controversy can be bewildering to most parents who may not also be educators, as well as for educators who truly want to teach children.

All of these debates about why American children don''t learn as well as they should ignore a very basic issue. Even if we add time to the school day, give new titles to federal funding, increase teacher salaries, reduce class size, fund education for children with special needs, and change tests to reflect differences in cultural environments and learning styles,we are still not facing a central problem in our schools.

Millions of children who have no actual diagnosable disorder that would affect learning--children with average, above-average, and even gifted intellectual abilities, including those from homes where education is valued--are simply not performing up to their capabilities. These children may be very creative or verbally or mathematically precocious, yet despite their abilities, they do not perform well in school. Social and emotional factors are the culprits, and psychological strategies must be used to prevent and reverse their underachievement.

Underachievers sit in virtually every classroom and live in many families. They waste educational resources, try the patience of even the best teachers, manipulate their families toward chaos, and destroy their own confidence and sense of personal control.

The problem is disconcertingly widespread. When I appeared for a five-minute interview on NBC''s Today show covering the topic of bright, underachieving children, that one segment attracted more than 20,000 phone calls and thousands of letters from distressed parents from all over the country (see Figure 1.1). It seems that I had hit a raw nerve for tens of thousands of families who recognized the symptoms of Underachievement Syndrome in their children...

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
20 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
... gifted and have been told their whole lives how smart they are
Reviewed in the United States on January 19, 2018
Makes sense of what is going on with kids who have tested as gifted and have been told their whole lives how smart they are. My child is being told by her teachers, "You''re so smart, I know you are capable of doing this work" then they turn around and reprimand... See more
Makes sense of what is going on with kids who have tested as gifted and have been told their whole lives how smart they are. My child is being told by her teachers, "You''re so smart, I know you are capable of doing this work" then they turn around and reprimand her for causing disruptions in class and her grades are terrible b/c she doesn''t turn in her work or study for tests. Obviously, this behavior is not conducive for learning, but their solution is punishment. Detention.

There is a place between letting your kid run the table and resorting to punishment. This book is helping me find that middle ground where I can understand her and help her find tools to solve her problems.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Al
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good general information about underachievers
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2011
I was looking for a book to help me get my 15 year old underachieving son back on track in school. I needed specifics and information that would be relevant to a teenager. This book had a lot of information about underachievers and about homework struggles in general, but... See more
I was looking for a book to help me get my 15 year old underachieving son back on track in school. I needed specifics and information that would be relevant to a teenager. This book had a lot of information about underachievers and about homework struggles in general, but it is geared towards elementary and middle school students. Reward systems and check-in lists for teachers were big suggestions and they will not work for high schoolers. The advice about parenting the different kinds of underachievers was helpful, though. We have been fairly indulgent and will definitely promote more independence in our son from here on out. I disagreed with the cross-gender identification advice, though. I think most families have one parent that will have more insight and patience for supervising homework and it isn''t necessarily (or even usually) the father, for the sons or daughters. Also, as a pediatrician, I was dismayed to read outdated ideas and advice about ADHD. The ability of a very active ("hyperactive") child to sit and play video games does NOT mean that the child can pay attention when asked to perform less interesting or engaging tasks, such as schoolwork. Overall, though, it provided a lot of general information about underachieving children, just not enough specifics for teenagers.
23 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
BrokenArrow
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very insightful and helpful book
Reviewed in the United States on May 24, 2009
The author avoids the psycho-pop-educational jargon to diagnosis the problem of bright kids who get bad grades, and also provide reasonable, helpful "cures" for the challenge. As a parent, I really enjoyed the book and received her advise as not only the wisdom of a... See more
The author avoids the psycho-pop-educational jargon to diagnosis the problem of bright kids who get bad grades, and also provide reasonable, helpful "cures" for the challenge. As a parent, I really enjoyed the book and received her advise as not only the wisdom of a seasoned professional, but the wisdom of good old common sense. Much appreciated.
8 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Anna Pollino
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades
Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2010
This is a book parents and educators alike would benefit from reading. From the title I thought it only applied to gifted students who are not movitated to learn to their full potential but it applies to all students. The author identifies traits all of us have that impacts... See more
This is a book parents and educators alike would benefit from reading. From the title I thought it only applied to gifted students who are not movitated to learn to their full potential but it applies to all students. The author identifies traits all of us have that impacts how we learn and recommends strategies to improve learning. Excellent, though-provoking, and an easy read!
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Suzanne
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
We found this to have a lot of good information and advise in dealing with our teen
Reviewed in the United States on June 15, 2015
We found this to have a lot of good information and advise in dealing with our teen. So much of the information really applied to our situation. What it did was give us a direction to head in where otherwise we really had no idea how to handle the problems we were having... See more
We found this to have a lot of good information and advise in dealing with our teen. So much of the information really applied to our situation. What it did was give us a direction to head in where otherwise we really had no idea how to handle the problems we were having as our son absolutely refused to do homework.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Barb Lance
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
good information
Reviewed in the United States on February 24, 2010
Very good information that I could easily start using. Have already seen HUGE differences.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Maritza Gonzalez
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great product!
Reviewed in the United States on March 16, 2010
Thanks so much to the author of this book for helping us figure out why our bright child refuses to do his school work- it''s so easy for him.
4 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Kimberly
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United States on May 29, 2016
I learned a lot!
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • kids books second grade
  • bees for kids
  • books about teachers
  • books about education theories

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale

new arrival Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades And What You online Can Do About It: A Six-Step Program for Parents and new arrival Teachers outlet sale